Wednesday, April 16, 2008

CARTER: BIN LADEN'S NEXT

Cartoon by Cox & Forkum, February 24, 2006

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter's tour of Israel and Palestine continues. Yesterday, he had an eventful day laying a wreath at the mausoleum of the late Palestinian embezzler Yasser Arafat and holding a meeting with an ex-minister in Hamas' government - Carter meets Hamas official, calls for group to be included in peace talks.

Carter hopes to use his negotiation skills, honed on a year's experience in dealing with the Iranian revolutionary government over United States hostages late in his own administration, to assist in bringing about a hudna between Israel and the Palestinians. He scoffed at the fact that in dealing with Hamas, he would be dealing with dictators and thugs dedicated to wiping out the Jewish State.

"When I go to a dictatorship, I only have to talk to one person and that's the dictator, because he speaks for all the people."

Carter is lamenting the fact that he can't pay a visit to Gaza to meet those friendly folk who fire qassam rockets at the people of Sderot (whose actions he described as "criminal" when he visited there earlier in his tour). My humble suggestion is that he volunteers to replace Gilad Shalit as a hostage of Hamas, a gesture which should ensure that he gets to savour all of the beauty, romance and intrigue of this fascinating part of the world.

And when that's over, he can use his talents to convince his own government and his own people that the time has come to smoke the peace pipe (or whatever he happens to be smoking) with Osama Bin Laden.

1 comment:

Wells Fargo said...

Jimmy just doesn't get it does he?

He would do the Palestinians much better service by giving them the truth.

Tell them how many millions Arafat stole.

Tell them how many people he and Hamas have killed on both sides - Jew and Arab.

Tell them why they have to live in squalor.

Tell them that if they lived up to their primary obligation in the Road Map - to disarm and arrest the terrorists - they would be well on the road to peace